26 June 2014

1st & 2nd Lovat's Scouts 1908-1914

These two regiments both had their origins in Imperial Yeomanry formations and of the two, certainly regarding numbering, the 1st Lovat's Scouts is easier to deal with.

My database begins in 1908 with three digit numbers which were probably originally issued to men joining the Imperial Yeomanry. By 1909 however, we're into four figures, thus:

1750 joined on 27th February 1909
1835 joined on 14th January 1910
1903 joined on 25th February 1911
2017 joined on 27th January 1912
2067 joined on 14th March 1913
2181 joined on 5th May 1914
2216 joined on 14th August 1914
2282 joined on 11th September 1914
2504 joined on 15th October 1914

The 2nd Lovat's Scouts are much harder to fathom due to the fact that this regiment was administered by three separate county associations, each of which issued men with numbers from different series. I have found very few early numbers for men who joined the Inverness Squadron or the Sutherland Squadron, more for men who joined the two Cromarty Squadrons which appear to have commenced their numbering at 4000 in 1908:

4010 joined on 14th January 1909
4076 joined on 25th March 1910
4125 joined on 9th March 1911
4180 joined on 7th May 1912
4125 joined on 21st February 1913
4265 joined on 23rd March 1914
4285 joined on 7th August 1914
4311 joined on 22nd September 1914

I am not sure how many of these three separate number series carried on beyond August 1914 but on the evidence I have in my database I have only seen numbers in the 5000 range and above.

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Lothians and Border Horse 1908-1914

The Lothians and Border Horse started numbering from 1 when it was formed out of its Imperial Yeomanry predecessor in April 1908. Charles Walter Grieve was given the new number 262 when he signed up on the 4th May 1908. In fact he was already a serving member with the Lothians and Border Horse Imperial Yeomanry and had been given the number 371 when he originally enlisted as 20-year-old in 1903. Then, his trade had been given as "Gentleman".

The regiment formed part of the Lowland Mounted Brigade which was administered from Edinburgh. Its own headquarters was also in Edinburgh with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Dunbar
B Squadron: Edinburgh
C Squadron: Hawick
D Squadron: Edinburgh

899 joined on 6th January 1909
1095 joined on 22nd February 1910
1190 joined on 27th October 1911
1268 joined on 15th April 1912
1401 joined on 8th May 1913
1520 joined on 26th July 1914
1586 joined on 31st August 1914
1650 joined on 3rd September 1914
1859 joined on 21st October 1914
1844 joined on 7th November 1914

A 2/1st unit was formed in 1914 and 3/1st unit in April 1915. Both these second and third line units shared their number sequence with the 1/1st.

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3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters) 1908-1914

This regiment continued with its existing numbering series when it was formed out of the Imperial Yeomanry in April 1908.  The regiment formed part of the London Mounted Brigade which was administered from the Duke of York's Headquarters in Chelsea. The regiment itself was headquartered at St John's Wood, London.

203 joined on 17th April 1908
551 joined on 24th September 1909
617 joined on 29th April 1910
701 joined on 31st March 1911
783 joined on 29th March 1912
952 joined on 27th June 1913
1067 joined on 5th August 1914

A 2/3rd unit was formed in August 1914 and 3/3rd unit in April 1915. Both these second and third line units shared their number sequence with the 1/3rd.

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2nd County of London Yeomanry (Westminster Dragoons)

This regiment continued with its existing numbering series when it was formed out of the Imperial Yeomanry in April 1908.  The regiment formed part of the London Mounted Brigade which was administered from the Duke of York's Headquarters in Chelsea. The regiment itself was headquartered at the Duke of York's Headquarters in Elverton Street, Westminster

474  joined on 28th April 1908
1281 joined on 8th July 1909
1384 joined on 4th October 1910
1420 joined on 1st February 1911
1546 joined on 11th June 1912
1600 joined on 16th January 1913
1727 joined on 25th February 1914
1831 joined on 6th August 1914
2209 joined on 11th September 1914

A 2/2nd unit was formed in September 1914 and 3/2nd unit in April 1915. Both these second and third line units shared their number sequence with the 1/2nd.

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1st County of London Yeomanry (Middlesex, Duke of Cambridge's Hussars)

This regiment continued with its existing numbering series when it was formed out of the Imperial Yeomanry in April 1908.  The regiment formed part of the London Mounted Brigade which was administered from the Duke of York's Headquarters in Chelsea. The regiment itself was also headquartered in Chelsea and recruited for all four squadrons from Chelsea
2254  joined on 7th April 1908
2713 joined on 18th February 1910
2912 joined on 6th March 1911
3004 joined on 10th January 1912
3166 joined on 31st March 1913
3296 joined on 23rd March 1914
3324 joined on 11th August 1914
3541 joined on 15th September 1914

A 2/1st unit was formed in September 1914 and 3/1st unit in 1915. Both these second and third line units shared their number sequence with the 1/1st.

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City of London Yeomanry (Rough Riders) 1908-1914

This regiment continued with its existing numbering series when it was formed out of the Imperial Yeomanry in April 1908.  The regiment formed part of the London Mounted Brigade which was administered from the Duke of York's Headquarters in Chelsea. The regiment itself was headquartered in Finsbury Square and recruited for all four squadrons from Finsbury Square.

1424 joined on 29th June 1908
1705 joined on March 11th 1910
1963 joined on 21st June 1912
2061 joined on 14th February 1913
2153 joined on 18th February 1914
2183 joined on 6th April 1914
2406 joined on 3rd September 1914
2744 joined on 19th October 1914
2778 joined on 6th November 1914
1849 joined on 15th December 1914

A 2/1st unit was formed in August 1914 and 3/1st unit in 1915. Both these second and third line units shared their number sequence with the 1/1st.

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3rd Scottish Horse 1914-1915

This unit did not exist before the war. It was formed in August 1914 and my data for it is patchy. I will complete the sequence below when more verified dates on which numbers were issued, come to light.

447 joined on 18th August 1914
1264 joined on 26th May 1915
1290 joined on 3rd June 1915
1521 joined on 26th August 1915
1553 joined on 19th September 1915
1715 joined on 15th November 1915

A 2/3rd Scottish Horse and a 3/3rd Scottish Horse were formed during the First World War and these units also drew numbers from the same series above.

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Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars 1908-1914


The Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars continued with its existing numbering sequence when it was formed in April 1908, most of the men joining that year being former Imperial Yeoman.

By August 1914 the regiment formed part of the 2nd South Midland Brigade which was administered from Oxford. Its own headquarters was also at Oxford with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Oxford
B Squadron: Woodstock
C Squadron: Henley-on-Thames
D Squadron: Banbury

1276 joined on 26th may 1908
1441 joined on 18th February 1909
1552 joined on 8th February 1910
1641 joined on 7th February 1911
1748 joined on 6th March 1912
1838 joined on 8th April 1913
1864 joined on 22nd January 1914
1955 joined on 7th August 1914
2019 joined on 3rd September 1914
2269 joined on 10th October 1914
2306 joined on 2nd November 1914
2385 joined on 5th December 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.
 
 
http://www.naval-military-press.com/product.php?productid=18376&partner=PaulNixon
 

This from the Naval & Military Press:

"The Oxford Hussars originated as the Oxfordshire Yeomanry, a unit raised in the Napoleonic Wars. By 1914, the unit formed part of the territorial army and were immediately mobilized on the outbreak of the Great War. The regiment saw early service in the autumn of 1914 in the doomed attempts to save Dunkirk and Antwerp from the German advance, and then fell into the routing of trench warfare, holding the line at Messines, just south of the Ypres salient. After experiencing a German gas attack in the second battle of Ypres in April 1915, which they warded off with primitive respirators, the unit continued to serve in the salient, seeing action at St Julien and Bellewaarde Wood, and later at Vermelles. Aftyer years of frustration caused by the paralysis of trench warfare the Hussars came into their own again with the resumption of the war of movement at the end of the war in 1918. This is an exceptionally lively history, full of character sketches of notable members of the regiment and gives a clear picture of the role of a British cavalry unit in and out of the trenches. Illustrated with 27 photographs and 13 maps."

Note that Appendix A of this regimental history provides useful information on the regiment's fatalities, often giving location of death not recorded elsewhere:

 


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Pembroke Yeomanry 1908-1914

The Pembroke Yeomanry was, from April 1908, administered by three separate County Associations and therefore operated three distinct numbering series from 1908.

The Pembrokeshire Association, responsible for the regiment's headquarters and A and B Squadrons, issued numbers beginning from 1:

49 joined on 21st May 1908
234 joined on 4th March 1909
275 joined on 5th march 1910
293 joined on 25th February 1911
342 joined on 30th March 1912
383 joined on 1st March 1913
415 joined on 1st March 1914
458 joined on 9th August 1914

The Carmarthenshire Association, responsible for C Squadron, issued numbers beginning from 2000. My data is a somewhat thin at this point in time:

2005 joined on 16th April 1908
2148 joined on 7th April 1911
2206 joined 19th March 1913
2234 joined on 2nd March 1914

The Cardiganshire Association, responsible for D Squadron, issued numbers beginning from 4000:

4010 joined on 8th April 1908
4098 joined on 3rd March 1909
4138 joined on 5th March 1910
4164 joined on 5th April 1911
4185 joined on 8th May 1912
4238 joined on 21st February 1914

By the time Britain went to war in 1914, the regiment, with its headquarters at Tenby, formed part of the South Wales Mounted Brigade and was disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Tenby
B Squadron: Haverfordwest
C Squadron: Carmarthen
D Squadron: Lampeter

In August 1914 the decision appears to have been taken to abandon the Pembrokeshire and Cardiganshire number series and issue new recruits with numbers in the 4000 range. Thus:

4265 joined on 30th September 1914
4271 joined on 2nd October 1914
4530 joined on 13th November 1914
4667 joined on 8th December 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the 4000 series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

25 June 2014

Westmorland and Cumberland Yeomanry 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Westmorland and Cumberland Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The Westmorland and Cumberland Yeomanry saw no need to start a new regimental numbering system from April 1908 and simply continued with the series that had been in use for years previously. Most of the enlistments in 1908 were men who were already serving as Imperial Yeomen.

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at Penrith with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Kendal, with drill stations at Carnforth, Kirkby Lonsdale, Ulverston & Windermere
B Squadron: Penrith, with drill stations at Keswick, Temple Sowerby and Cockermouth 
C Squadron: Whitehaven, with drill stations at Workington, Maryport and Barrow-in-Furness 
D Squadron: Carlisle, with drill stations at Wigton and Aleton

The regiment formed part of the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade which was administered from Shrewsbury.

1623 joined on 11th April 1908
1710 joined on 6th January 1909
1778 joined on 15th February 1910
1856 joined on 27th January 1911
2056 joined on 23rd November 1912
2094 joined on 1st February 1913
2221 joined on 3rd March 1914
2252 joined on 5th August 1914
2273 joined on 10th September 1914
2472 joined on 9th October 1914
2600 joined on 2nd November 1914
2788 joined on 8th December 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Montgomeryshire Yeomanry 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Montgomeryshire Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment saw no need to begin a new regimental number series when it became the Montgomeryshire Yeomanry in 1908 and instead continued with the number series that had been in uses when it was the Montgomeryshire Imperial Yeomanry.

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at Welshpool with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Llanfyllin
B Squadron: Welshpool
C Squadron: Newtown
D Squadron: Llandindrod Wells

The regiment formed part of the 1st South Wales Mounted Brigade which was administered from Pembroke.

1140 joined on 27th May 1908
1639 joined on 26th April 1909
1700 joined on 9th March 1910
1798 joined on 23rd May 1911
1843 joined on 13th February 1912
1911 joined on 20th February 1913
2059 joined on 21st March1914
2276 joined on 25th August 1914
2360 joined on 7th September 1914
2708 joined on 12th October 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry (Prince of Wales's Own Royal Regiment) 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry (Prince of Wales's Own) between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment started numbering from in April 1908 albeit most of the men who joined that year were already serving yeomen with the Wiltshire Imperial Yeomanry.

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at Chippenham with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Warminster
B Squadron: Chirton
C Squadron: Chippenham
D Squadron: Swindon

The regiment formed part of the 1st South Western Mounted Brigade which was administered from Salisbury.

16 joined on 6th April 1908
283 joined on 27th March 1909
378 joined on 23rd May 1910
458 joined on 11th April 1911
584 joined on 9th March 1912
647 joined on 21st January 1913
784 joined on 25th February 1914
871 joined on 8th August 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Queen's Own Yorkshire Dragoons 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Yorkshire Dragoons (Queen's Own) between 1908 and 1914.

In common with many yeomanry regiments, the Yorkshire Dragoons saw no need to start a completely new regimental numbering system from April 1908 and simply continued with the series that had been in use for years previously. Most of the enlistments in 1908 were by men who were already serving as Imperial Yeomen.

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at Doncaster with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Sheffield
B Squadron: Wakefield
C Squadron: Doncaster
D Squadron: Huddersfield

The regiment formed part of the Yorkshire Mounted Brigade which was administered from York.

1592 joined on 4th June 1908 (but the number dates to 1903)
2261 joined on 2nd March 1909
2384 joined on 15th April 1910
2449 joined on 1st March 1911
2543 joined on 19th February 1912
2671 joined on 7th April 1913
2752 joined on 1st January 1914
2814 joined on 3rd August 1914
3199 joined on 2nd November 1914
3358 joined on 11th December 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Yorkshire Hussars (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own) 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Yorkshire Hussars (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own) between 1908 and 1914.

Numbering in the regiment from April 1908 was a continuation of the numbering which had been in place in the regiment's previous incarnation as Imperial Yeomanry. For example, 515 John Palliser joined the regiment on 17th April 1908. However this was the number he had been given when he had originally attested with the Imperial Yeomanry two years earlier on the 1st April 1906.

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at York with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Leeds
B Squadron: York
C Squadron: Knaresborough
D Squadron: Middlesbrough

The regiment formed part of the Yorkshire Mounted Brigade which was administered from York.

1732 joined on 30th January 1909
1845 joined on 1st April 1910
1914 joined on 1st March 1911
2020 joined on 1st March 1912
2090 joined on 1st February 1913
2281 joined on 11th April 1914
2292 joined on 7th August 1914
2306 joined on 1st September 1914
2739 joined on 12th October 1914
2797 joined on 16th November 1914
2827 joined on 1st December 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

East Riding of Yorkshire Yeomanry 1908-1914

When Gerald Lisle des Goutles Bown joined the East Riding of Yorkshire Yeomanry on 15th April 1908 he was already a serving member of the East Riding of Yorkshire Imperial Yeomanry having joined the regiment in February 1903. Given that the regiment recruited at around 100 men per annum between 1908 and 1913, I presume the number he was issued with - 233 - was his original Imperial Yeomanry number.

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at Beverley with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Hull
B Squadron: Beverley
C Squadron: Fulford
D Squadron:: Driffield

The regiment formed part of the Yorkshire Mounted Brigade which was administered from York.

872 joined on 9th March 1909
977 joined on 10th March 1910
1019 joined on 3rd January 1911
1122 joined on 1st March 1912
1206 joined on 22nd February 1913
1319 joined on 26th March 1914
1372 joined on 4th August 1914
1611 joined on 3rd September 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

24 June 2014

Staffordshire Yeomanry (Queen's Own Royal Regiment) 1908-1914

The Staffordshire Yeomanry did not start numbering from 1 in 1908 but instead continued with the numbering sequence it had been using when it was the Staffordshire Imperial Yeomanry. Lionel Bates was given the number 2074 when he joined the regiment in May 1908. This though, was the number he'd been given when he joined the Staffordshire Imperial Yeomanry on the 16th November 1907.

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at Bailey Street, Stafford, with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Walsall, with drill stations at West Bromwich, Tamworth, Lichfield and Sutton Coldfield
B Squadron: Stoke-on-Trent, with drill stations at Stafford, Leek, Cannock and Newcatle-under-Lyme
C Squadron: Burton-on-Trent, with a drill station at Uttoxeter
D Squadron: Wolverhampton, with a drill station at Himley

The regiment formed part of the North Midland Mounted Brigade which was administered from Leicester.

2367 joined on 2nd September 1909
2394 joined on 27th January 1910
2476 joined on 7th January 1911
2617 joined on 2nd April 1912
2684 joined on 9th January 1913
2835 joined on 27th March 1914
2847 joined on 5th August 1914
2949 joined on 21st September 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Duke of Lancaster's Own Yeomanry 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Duke of Lancaster's Own Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The majority of the men who joined the regiment in 1908 were former Imperial Yeoman, joining the newly constituted regiment with their old Imperial Yeomanry or indeed, pre Imperial Yeomanry numbers. For example, 523 Albert Hilton, born in Manchester around 1871 joined the regiment on the 8th April 1908 but his number dates to 3rd October 1895.

By 1914 the Duke of Lancaster's Own Yeomanry were headquartered at Lancaster House, Whalley Road, Whalley Range, Manchester, with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Oldham, with a drill station at Rochdale
B Squadron: Bolton, with a drill station at Liverpool
C Squadron: Manchester
D Squadron: Preston, with a drill station at Blackpool

The regiment formed part of the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade which was administered from Shrewsbury.

2818 joined on 7th April 1909
2911 joined on 18th April 1910
2959 joined on 9th January 1911
3059 joined on 1st February 1912
3175 joined on 10th February 1913
3294 joined on 25th February 1914
3339 joined on 2nd August 1914
3634 joined on 7th October 1914
3874 joined on 16th December1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Leicestershire Yeomanry (Prince Albert's Own) 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Leicestershire Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

In common with many Yeomanry regiments, the Leicestershire Yeomanry can trace its origins back to the French Revolutionary Wars and 1794 when it was formed as a volunteer cavalry unit. It was re-raised in 1803 as the Leicestershire Yeomanry Cavalry and by 1908 had become the Leicestershire Yeomanry (Prince Albert's Own).

The majority of the men who joined in that year were former Imperial Yeoman, joining the newly constituted regiment with their old Imperial Yeomanry numbers. 

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at Leicester, with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Melton Mowbray
B Squadron: Leicester
C Squadron: Loughborough
D Squadron: Lutterworth

The regiment formed part of the North Midland Mounted Brigade which was administered from Leicester.

1504 joined on 28th May 1908
1620 joined on 6th April 1909
1649 joined on 1st February 1910
1753 joined on 27th January 1911
1846 joined on 5th March 1912
1950 joined on 19th May 1913
2043 joined on 4th April 1914
2101 joined on 6th August 1914
2161 joined on 21st September 1914
2200 joined on 10th October 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

The photo above shows C Squadron, Leicestershire Yeomanry assembled outside the Bull's Head stable yard on 6th August 1914. 1756 Henry Thirlby Hack MM who I interviewed at his home in Sutton Bonington in 1985 stands in the third row from the front, second from the left. On the far left of the second row is Sergeant Major Diggle. His son, 1760 Bertie Diggle, would be killed in action at Frezenberg near Ypres on 13th may 1915.  Pictured below, Thirlby Hack in bath-chair recovering from his wounds in England after the same action at Frezenberg. Thirlby's number indicates that he joined the regiment in February 1911 (although he recalled his joining date as 1910). He can be forgiven, he was recalling events seven decades later.

Read the interview I conducted with Henry Thirlby Hack MM on my World War 1 veterans' blog.

 
 
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2nd Scottish Horse 1908-1914

I have considerable gaps in my database for this regiment which I'll fill as and when more information comes to light.

The Scottish Horse were raised for the Boer War and fought as one regiment during that conflict. It was comprised of volunteers from Australia, Scotland and South Africa. By 1908 it had expanded into two regiments: The 1st Scottish Horse and the 2nd Scottish Horse, with the 2nd Scottish Horse spread across the counties of Aberdeenshire, Argyllshire, Elgin and Nairn and disposed as follows:

Headquarters: Aberdeen
A Squadron: Elgin
B Squadron: Kintore
C Squadron: Aberdeen
D Squadron: Connell

Numbering in this regiment is complex and there appear to have been at least threes series - and possibly four - in use at the same time. This is not uncommon for those regiments which would have been administered by more than one County Association

Although there is a lot of guesswork on my behalf at this point in time, it would appear that :

a) numbers did not start from 1 in 1908 but continued with the numbering sequence that had been in use in Imperial Yeomanry days
b) numbers up to 2000 were used for men from Aberdeenshire
c) numbers between 2001 and 4000 were allocated to men from the City of Aberdeen

I also have numbers in the 4000+ range which, pre August 1914, appear to have been issued to men from Argyll.

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

1st Scottish Horse 1908-1914

I have gaps in my database for this regiment which I'll fill as and when more information comes to light.

The Scottish Horse were raised for the Boer War and fought as one regiment during that conflict. It was comprised of volunteers from Australia, Scotland and South Africa. By 1908 it had expanded into two regiments: The 1st Scottish Horse and the 2nd Scottish Horse, with the 1st Scottish Horse designated as the county regiment for Perthshire and disposed as follows:

Headquarters: Dunkeld
A Squadron: Blair Atholl
B Squadron: Dunkeld
C Squadron: Coupar Angus
D Squadron: Dunblane

The regiment did not start numbering from 1 in 1908 but continued with the numbering series which had been used by the Imperial Yeomanry.

1664 joined on 25th May 1908
3623 joined on 11th February 1911
3463 joined on 20th February 1912
3295 joined on 20th December 1913
3300 joined on 24th January 1914
3531 joined on 7th August 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

West Somerset Yeomanry 1908-1914



This post will look at numbering in the West Somerset Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment can trace its origins back to 1793 when it was raised as the Somersetshire Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry. When it became the West Somerset Yeomanry in 1908, it continued with the numbering series it had used when it was the West Somerset Imperial Yeomanry. Most of the men who joined in 1908 were former Imperial Yeoman - albeit joining the newly constituted regiment with new numbers which had started at 1. For instance, Samuel David who joined on 21st April 1908 was given the number 216 even though he had been a serving Imperial Yeoman with the number 623.

By 1914 the West Somerset Yeomanry were headquartered at Taunton, with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Wellington
B Squadron: Taunton
C Squadron: Bridgwater
D Squadron: Yeovil

The regiment formed part of the 2nd South Western Mounted Brigade which was administered from Exeter.

417 joined on  18th February 1909
445 joined on 29th January 1910
558 joined on 25th January 1911
619 joined on 13th March 1912
686 joined on 13th February 1913
792 joined on 5th January1914
888 joined on 4th August 1914
1065 joined on 1st September 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

Image borrowed from britisharmedforces.org

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

North Somerset Yeomanry 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the North Somerset Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment was originally raised as the North Somerset Yeomanry Cavalry in 1814.  As the North Somerset Yeomanry it started numbering from 1 in 1908, albeit the majority of the men who attested that year had seen prior service with the Imperial Yeomanry.

By 1914 the regiment was headquartered at Bath with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Bath, with drill stations at Bathampton, Farmborough, Frome, Mells and Road (now Rode)
B Squadron: Weston-Super-Mare, with drill stations at Axbridge, Clevedon, Langford and Nailsea
C Squadron: Shepton Mallet, with drill stations at Queen Camel, Ston Easton, Wells, Wincanton and Castle Cory
D Squadron: Bristol, with drill stations at Queen Charlton, Barrow Gurney and Keynsham

The regiment formed part of the 1st South Western Mounted Brigade which was administered from Salisbury in Wiltshire.

24 joined on 6th April 1908
166 joined on 11th April 1909
250 joined on 11th March 1910
339  joined on 25th May 1911
369 joined on 24th February1912
464 joined on 24th March 1913
563 joined on 10th March 1914
616 joined on 10th August 1914
722 joined on 4th September 1914
876 joined on 13th November 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

23 June 2014

Welsh Horse 1914-1916

The Welsh Horse was a new formation raised in 1914 and whilst it had no lineage to trace, it was at least unencumbered by earlier regimental numbering sequences. It started numbering, logically, from 1 in August 1914. By 19th August 1914, 120 men had already joined the regiment, and many more would follow that month and into September.

435 joined on 10th September 1914
478 joined on 10th November 1914
677 joined on 4th January 1915
953 joined on 7th February 1915
1233 joined on 20th May 1915
1284 joined on 1st June 1915
1388 joined on 13th July 1915
1447 joined on 1st November 1915
1569 joined on 15th December 1915
1724 joined on 31st March 1916
1757 joined on 14th April 1916
1772 joined on 1st May 1916

The regiment was initially attached to the North Midland Mounted Brigade of the 1st Mounted Division, later transferring to the Eastern Mounted Brigade in the same Division. Two reserve units, the 2/1st (formed in September 1914) and the  3/1st (formed in 1915) both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.



Suffolk Yeomanry 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Suffolk Yeomanry (The Duke of York's Own Loyal Suffolk Hussars) between 1908 and 1914.

In common with many Yeomanry regiments, the Suffolk Yeomanry can trace its origins back to the French Revolutionary Wars and 1793 when it was formed as a volunteer cavalry unit, The Loyal Suffolk Hussars. When it became the Suffolk Yeomanry in 1908, it continued with the numbering series it had used when it was the Suffolk Imperial Yeomanry. The majority of the men who joined in 1908 were former Imperial Yeoman, joining the newly constituted regiment with their old Imperial Yeomanry numbers. For example, Walter Robert Falgate, born in 1879, joined the Suffolk Yeomanry on the 25th May 1908 but his number dates to 22nd October 1902 when he joined the Imperial Yeomanry. He was finally discharged as no longer physically fit for war service - and with the rank of regimental Sergeant Major - in October 1916.

By 1914 the Suffolk Yeomanry were headquartered at Bury St Edmunds, with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Cambridge, with a drill station at Ely
B Squadron: Bury St Edmunds, with drill stations at Eye, Thetford, Sudbury and Stowmarket
C Squadron: Ipswich, with drill stations at Felixstowe, Framlingham and Woodbridge
D Squadron: Beccles, with drill stations at Bungay, Halesworth, Lowestoft and Leiston

The regiment formed part of the Eastern Mounted Brigade which was administered from Colchester.

1282 joined on 8th March 1909
1335 joined on 7th January 1910
1392 joined on 10th February 1911
1453 joined on 9th March 1912
1524 joined on 4th November 1913
1568 joined on 13th April 1914
1610 joined on 12th August 1914
1643 joined on 2nd September 1914
1782 joined on 4th December1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

Image courtesy Hussards Photos which really is a mine of information and well worth book-marking.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Warwickshire Yeomanry 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Warwickshire Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment can trace its origins back to 1794 when it was raised as the Gentlemen and Yeomanry of Warwickshire Cavalry. When it became the Warwickshire Yeomanry in 1908, it continued with the numbering series it had used when it was the Warwickshire Imperial Yeomanry. Most of the men who joined in 1908 were former Imperial Yeoman - joining the newly constituted regiment with their old Imperial Yeomanry numbers. For example, 1106 Samuel Crosby Cockburn joined on the 16th May 1908 but his number dates to 3rd March 1904 when he joined the Imperial Yeomanry. His Yeomanry attestation papers and his Imperial Yeomanry attestation papers survive in a water-damaged state in WO 363.

By 1914 the Warwickshire Yeomanry were headquartered at St John's Warwick, with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Birmingham
B Squadron: Warwick, with drill stations at Kineton, Brailes and Southam
C Squadron: Coventry, with drill stations at Rugby and Nuneaton
D Squadron: Stratford-on-Avon, with drill stations at Henley-in-Arden, Salford Priors and Weaton-Sub-Edge

The regiment formed part of the 1st South Midland Mounted Brigade which was administered from Warwick.

1543 joined on 23rd January 1909
1651 joined on 17th January 1910
1703 joined on 28th January 1911
1843 joined on 7th February1912
2041 joined on 6th November 1913
2105 joined on 28th February1914
2120 joined on 8th August 1914
2144 joined on 1st September 1914
2478 joined on 1st October1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

17 June 2014

West Riding Royal Horse Artillery 1908-1914


Here are some numbers and enlistment dates for the West Riding Royal Horse Artillery - a Territorial Force formation - between 1908 and 1914.

49 joined on 15th June 1908
185 joined on 25th January 1909
261 joined on 26th Match 1910
327 joined on 11th September 1911
380 joined on 27th April 1912
437 joined on 6th May 1913
511 joined on 7th April 1914
529 joined on 4th August 1914
553 joined on 1st September 1914

When the Territorial Force was re-numbered in 1917, the West Riding RHA was issued numbers in the range 608001 to 610000. The lower the six digit number, the earlier the man enlisted - so 608001 would have been issued to the longest serving man in the regiment who was still serving at the point in time the numbers were issued.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.


16 June 2014

South Nottinghamshire Hussars 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the South Nottinghamshire Hussars between 1908 and 1914.

Like the Sherwood Rangers, the South Nottinghamshire Hussars can trace its origins back to 1794. In April 1908 when it became the South Nottinghamshire Hussars, it started numbering from 1, the majority of the men joining that year being serving members of the Imperial Yeomanry. Samuel Clarke of Watnall, Nottingham was one of those former Imperial Yeoman. He attested on the 29th May 1908 and was given the number 117

By 1914 the Sherwood Rangers were headquartered at Nottingham, with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Bingham, with drill stations at Carlton, Plumtree and Southwell
B Squadron: Watnall, with drill stations at Arnold and Eastwood
C Squadron: Nottingham
D Squadron: Wollaton, with a drill station at Long Eaton

The regiment formed part of the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Mounted Brigade which was administered from Nottingham.

459 joined on 17th February 1909
564 joined on 17th January 1910
669 joined on 25th February 1911
746 joined on 13th January1912
858 joined on 15th January 1913
949 joined on 27th January1914
1006 joined on 9th August 1914
1046 joined on 15th September 1914
1408 joined on 12th October 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Nottinghamshire Yeomanry (Sherwood Rangers) 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Nottinghamshire Yeomanry (Sherwood Rangers) between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment can trace its origins back to 1794 when it was raised as the Nottinghamshire Yeomanry Cavalry and when it became the Nottinghamshire Yeomanry (Sherwood Rangers) in 1908, it continued with the numbering series it had used when it was the Sherwood Rangers Imperial Yeomanry. Most of the men who joined in 1908 were former Imperial Yeoman - joining the newly constituted regiment with their old Imperial Yeomanry numbers. For example, 941 Edward Pogmore joined on the 12th May1908 but his number dates to over two years earlier - 9th January 1906 - when he joined the Imperial Yeomanry.

By 1914 the Sherwood Rangers were headquartered at Retford, with its four companies disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Newark, with drill stations at Sutton-on-Trent and Collingham
B Squadron: Mansfield, with drill stations at Chesterfield, Alfreton, Pinxton and Kirkby-in-Ashfield
C Squadron: Worksop, with drill stations at Clumber and Normanton
D Squadron: Retford, with drill stations at Ranskill, Trent Port, Melton Ross and Misterton

The regiment formed part of the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Mounted Brigade which was administered from Nottingham.

1186 joined on 9th January 1909
1459 joined on 11th July 1910
1489 joined on 20th January 1911
1576 joined on 26th January1912
1665 joined on 20th February 1913
1811 joined on 21st February1914
1860 joined on 3rd August 1914
1941 joined on 11th September 1914
2346 joined on 16th November 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

15 June 2014

Nothumberland Hussars 1908-1914

In common with The Lanarkshire Yeomanry, and others, the Northumberland Hussars was administered by more than one County Association and as such it operated two distinct number series.

The Northumberland Association was responsible for the administration of the Northumberland Hussars Headquarters (situated at Northumberland Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne) and three squadrons: A Squadron (Newcastle-upon-Tyne), B Squadron (South Shields) and C Squadron (Morpeth). It started numbering from 1 in 1908.

33 joined on 4th May 1908
264 joined on 29th April 1909
471 joined on 19th March 1911
522 joined on 1st June 1912
537 joined on 4th March 1913
632 joined on 11th March 1914
686 joined on 6th January 1914
748 joined on 6th August 1914
814 joined on 3rd September 1914
1210 joined on 8th October 1914
1363 joined on 4th November 1914

The Durham Association administered D Squadron (Hexham) and the earliest number I have is 2000 on 2nd May 1908.

2129 joined in February 1910
2160 joined on 1st April 1911
2184 joined on 1st March 1912
2209 joined on 1st January 1913
2262 joined on 20th May 1914

This second series appears to have been discontinued by August 1914.

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and these drew their numbers from the Northumberland Association series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Northamptonshire Yeomanry 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Northamptonshire Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment was raised during the Boer War as the Northamptonshire Imperial Yeomanry. When it became the Northamptonshire Yeomanry in 1908, it started numbering from 1. Most of the men who joined in 1908 were former Northamptonshire Imperial Yeoman. For instance, Roland Thomas Everitt was given the number 90 when he enlisted on the 2nd May 1908. In fact, as can be seen from the third page of his attestation papers above, he had originally joined the Imperial Yeomanry at Peterborough in March 1903. These early documents can give a wealth of information and in Roland Everitt's case we see a pretty full service history on one page - including all training camps attended.

By 1914 the Northamptonshire Yeomanry was headquartered at Northampton with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Northampton
B Squadron: Peterborough
C Squadron: Kettering
D Squadron: Daventry

The regiment formed part of the Eastern Mounted Brigade which was administered from Colchester in Essex.

354 joined on 10th February 1909
460 joined on 9th March 1910
552 joined on 4th February 1911
646 joined on 6th February1912
788 joined on 29th January 1913
901 joined on 13th February 1914
961 joined on 8th August 1914
1065 joined on 7th September 1914
1277 joined on 21st October 1914
1493 joined on 17th November 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

The image is Crown Copyright and reproduced with the permission of the National Archives.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

14 June 2014

Norfolk Yeomanry 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Norfolk Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment was raised in 1901 as the Norfolk (King's Own) Imperial Yeomanry and when it became the Norfolk Yeomanry (King's Own Royal Regiment) in 1908, it continued with the numbering series it had used when it was the Imperial Yeomanry. Most of the men who joined in 1908 were former Norfolk Imperial Yeoman - joining the newly constituted regiment with their old Imperial Yeomanry numbers. So for instance, 882 David Amiss joined on the 1st April 1908 but his number dates to a year earlier - 13th April 1907 - when he joined the Imperial Yeomanry. Starting from 1 in 1901 and only reaching 882 by April 1907 also illustrates just how slowly many yeomanry regiments recruited.

By 1914 the Norfolk Yeomanry was headquartered at Castle Market Street, Norwich, with its four squadrons disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Norwich
B Squadron: North Walsham
C Squadron: Fakenham
D Squadron: King's Lynn

The regiment formed part of the Eastern Mounted Brigade which was administered from Colchester in Essex.

1134 joined on25th June 1909
1220 joined on 26th April 1910
1281 joined on 16th March 1911
1339 joined on 16th February1912
1455 joined on 24th July 1913
1494 joined on 16th January 1914
1587 joined on 8th August 1914
1674 joined on 15th September 1914
1813 joined on 13th October 1914
1955 joined on 2nd November 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Lancashire Hussars 1908-1914



This post will look at numbering in the Lancashire Hussars between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment started numbering from 1 in 1908 although the majority of enlistments that year were men who were already serving with the Lancashire Hussars Imperial Yeomanry. For instance, 107 John Byron joined the Lancashire Hussars on the 21st April, indicating that he was already serving with the Lancashire Hussars IY. His Imperial Yeomanry number - 314 - appears on his attestation paper but has been crossed out. Two pages in, we see that he originally joined the Imperial Yeomanry ten years earlier on the 2nd January 1898 and had risen to the rank of sergeant by 1908.

By 1914 the Lancashire Hussars was headquartered at Prince Albert Road, Liverpool. A Squadron was at Ashton-in-Makerfield with drill stations at Wigan and Liverpool. B Squadron was at St Helens, C Squadron at Newton-Le-Willows and D Squadron at Rainhill. The regiment was attached to the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade for training.

107 joined on 21st April 1908
404 joined on 2nd February 1909
520 joined on 2nd April 1910
675 joined on 8th February 1911
742 joined on 3rd January 1912
774 joined on 29th January 1913
898 joined on 14th January 1914
990 joined on 28th August 1914
1170 joined on 7th September 1914

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and both drew their numbers from the same series above.

 I found the image on this post on a great little site: The Duke of Lancaster's Own Yeomanry Archives Project. It depicts 2Lt Geoffrey Langton Pilkington of the Lancashire Hussars.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Lanarkshire Yeomanry 1908-1914



The Lanarkshire Yeomanry was another one of those Territorial Force formations administered by more than one County Association and as such it operated two distinct number series.

The Lanark Association was responsible for the administration of the Lanarkshire Yeomanry Headquarters (situated at Lanark) and three squadrons: A Squadron (Douglas), B Squadron (Lanark) and C Squadron (Coatbridge). Its numbers began at 1 in 1908; samples as follows:

80 joined on 23rd May 1908
185 joined on 1st April 1909
347 joined on 14th January 1911
474 joined on 27th April 1912
564 joined on 5th April 1913
660 joined on 11th April 1914
707 joined on 3rd September 1914
947 joined on 18th November 1914

The Dumfries Association administered D Squadron (Dumfries) and its numbering started from 2000 in 1908:

2030 joined on 5th June 1908
2097 joined on 23th March 1909
2110 joined on 12th March 1910
2156 joined on 5th May 1911
2168 joined on 24th February 1912
2196 joined on 22nd March 1913
2218 joined on 19th May 1914
2224 joined on 7th September 1914
2308 joined on 30th September 1914

Both number series appear to have been continued up until 1917 when, with the re-numbering of the Territorial Force as a whole, men serving in the Lanarkshire Yeomanry were issued with new numbers within the range 35001-40000.

Two reserve units, the 2/1st and 3/1st, were formed during the First World War and these drew their numbers from the same series above.

Lanarkshire Yeomanry cap badge borrowed from the Scottish Regimental Badges website, with thanks.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

13 June 2014

Queen's Own Royal West Kent Yeomanry 1908-1914



This post will look at numbering in the Queen’s Own West Kent Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

When, on 1st April 1908, it became the Queen’s Own West Kent Yeomanry, the regiment continued with the numbering series which it had used when it was the Imperial Yeomanry. Men who transferred from the Imperial Yeomanry to the Yeomanry retained their Imperial Yeomanry numbers and the majority of 1908 enlistments were men who had formerly served in the Imperial Yeomanry.

By 1914 the regiment formed part of the South Eastern Mounted Brigade and had its headquarters at Maidstone. Its four squadrons were disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Bromley
B Squadron: Dartford
C Squadron: Tunbridge
D Squadron: Maidstone

219 joined on 23rd May 1908
378 joined on 1st January 1909
542 joined on 2nd April 1910
638 joined on 19th May 1911
731 joined on 10th July 1912
863 joined on 30th June 1913
922 joined on 9th January 1914
1001 joined on 4th August 1914

In August 1914 the 2/1st Queen’s Own West Kent Yeomanry was formed at Maidstone. A 3/1st battalion was formed – earlier than many other yeomanry regiments’ 3rd line units - at Canterbury at the end of 1914. All three yeomanry regiments drew their regimental numbers from the same regimental number series.

The image (which is Crown Copyright and reproduced with the permission of the National Archives) shows the March 1902 Imperial Yeomanry attestation of 445 William Skelton. He was one of the men who, in 1908, would transfer to the newly formed Royal West Kent Yeomanry. He was given the number 36.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Royal East Kent Yeomanry 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Royal East Kent Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

When, on 1st April 1908, it became the Royal East Kent Yeomanry, it continued with the numbering series which it had used when it was the Imperial Yeomanry. Men who transferred from the Imperial Yeomanry to the Yeomanry retained their Imperial Yeomanry numbers and the majority of 1908 enlistments were men who had formerly served in the Imperial Yeomanry. For instance, 886 J B Collins has an enlistment date of 6th April 1908 but in fact his number dates to 1905.


By 1914 the regiment formed part of the South Eastern Mounted Brigade and had its headquarters at Canterbury. Its four squadrons were disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Chatham
B Squadron: Faversham
C Squadron: Dover
D Squadron: Ashford

1212 joined on 12th January 1909
1262 joined on 12th February 1910

1366 joined on 20th April 1911
1505 joined on 14th September 1912
1529 joined on 17thJanuary 1913
1672 joined on 9th May 1914
1764 joined on 31st August 1914

In
September 1914 the 2/1st Royal East Kent Yeomanry was formed, supplying drafts for the 1/1st Battalion. It was converted into a cyclist unit in 1916 and then back into a yeomanry regiment in 1917.


A 3/1st Battalion was formed in 1915 and this was later disbanded in 1917, men transferring into the 2/4th Buffs. All three yeomanry regiments drew their regimental numbers from the same regimental number series.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

12 June 2014

Royal Gloucestershire Hussars 1908-1914




This post will look at numbering in the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars between 1908 and 1914.

When, on 1st April 1908, the Territorial Force came into being, men transferring from the Imperial Yeomanry retained their old Imperial Yeomanry numbers. Consequently the majority of 1908 enlistments were men who had formerly served in the Imperial Yeomanry.
 
By 1914 the regiment formed part of the 1st South Midland Mounted Brigade and was headquartered at Gloucester. A Squadron was also based in Gloucester, B Squadron in Stroud, C Squadron in Newport and D Squadron in Bristol.
 
1467 joined on 1st April 1908
1659 joined on 22nd February 1909
1761 joined on 7th March 1910
1823 joined on 1st February 1911
1998 joined on 20th December 1912
2003 joined on 15th January 1913
2118 joined on 28th March 1914
2155 joined on 10th August 1914
2361 joined on 16th September 1914
2502 joined on 7th October 1914
2657 joined on 18th November 1914

In September 1914 the 2/1st Royal Gloucestershire Hussars was formed at Gloucester and later, in July 1916, converted into a cyclist unit. A 3/1st unit, formed in 1915, was absorbed into the 5th Reserve Cavalry Regiment in 1917. All three units drew their regimental numbers from the same series.


Image courtesy of the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars website which depicts Colonel A J Palmer in 1902.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Queen’s Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Queen’s Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

When, on 1st April 1908, it became the Queen’s Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry, it continued with the numbering series which it had used when it was the Imperial Yeomanry. Men who transferred from the Imperial Yeomanry to the Yeomanry retained their Imperial Yeomanry numbers and the majority of 1908 enlistments were men who had formerly served in the Imperial Yeomanry.

974 joined on 6th April 1908
1553 joined on 25th February 1909
1684 joined on 18th February 1910
1802 joined on 16th January 1911
1997 joined on 19th December 1912
2009 joined on 28th January 1913
2228 joined on 3rd March 1914
2275 joined on 6th August 1914
2316 joined on 1st September 1914

In September 1914 the 2/1st Queen’s Own Royal Glasgow Yeomanry was formed, and this was followed in 1915 with a  3/1st unit which remained in the UK until disbanded in 1917. All three units drew their regimental numbers from the same series.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Glamorgan Yeomanry 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Glamorgan Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment, which started numbering from 1 in 1901
was headquartered at Bridgend and formed part of the South Wales Mounted Brigade. Its four squadrons were disposed as follows:

A Squadron: Swansea
B Squadron: Bridgend
C Squadron: Cardiff
D Squadron: Pontypridd

445 joined on 27th May 1908
990 joined on 6th January 1909
1122 joined on 18th April 1910
1196 joined on 15th March 1911
1242 joined on 1st April 1912
1265 joined on 27th February 1913
1354 joined on 1st May 1914
1464 joined on 8th August 1914
1730 joined on 18th September 1914


In September 1914 the 2/1st Glamorgan Yeomanry was formed, later converting into a cyclist unit in November 1917. A 3/1st unit was formed in 1915 which remained in the UK until disbanded in 1917. All three units drew their regimental numbers from the same series.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

11 June 2014

Royal North Devon Yeomanry 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Royal North Devon Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

By 1914 The regiment, headquartered at Barnstaple and forming part of the 2nd South Western Mounted Brigade, was distributed as follows:

A Squadron: Holsworthy, with drill stations at Black Torrington, Hetherleigh, Bratton Clovelly, Woodford Bridge and Bradworthy
B Squadron: Barnstaple, with drill stations at Atherington, Bratton Fleming, Blackmoor Gate, Fremington, Swimbridge, West Down, Braunton
C Squadron: South Molton, with drill stations at West Buckland, Molland, Chittlehampton, Sandyway, Ashreigney and Chumleigh
D Squadron: Torrington, with drill stations at Woolsery, Langtree, Parkham, High Bickington, Bideford and Roborough   

The regiment started numbering from 1 in April 1908, those men transferring from the Royal North Devonshire Imperial Yeomanry being issued with new numbers. The majority of 1908 enlistments were men who had formerly served in the Imperial Yeomanry.

327 joined on 30th April 1908
444 joined on 24th February 1909
565 joined on 31st January 1910
631 joined on 6th January 1911
727 joined on 31st January 1912
829 joined on 17th February 1913
936 joined on 25th February1914
991 joined on 8th August 1914
1155 joined on 2nd October 1914


In September 1914 the 2/1st Royal North Devon Yeomanry was formed, and in due course a 3/1st was formed in 1915. All three units drew their regimental numbers from the same series.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Dorset Yeomanry (Queen's Own) 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Dorset Yeomanry (Queen’s Own) between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment
was founded in 1794 as the Dorsetshire Regiment of Volunteer Yeomanry Cavalry and by 1914 had undergone several name changes. It was headquartered at Sherborne and formed part of the 1st South Western Mounted Brigade. The four squadrons and drill stations were distributed as follows:

A Squadron: Dorchester, with drill stations at Bridport, Weymouth, Maiden Newton and Charmouth
B Squadron: Sherborne, with drill stations at Yeovil and Pulham
C Squadron: Blandford, with drill stations at Wimborne, Wareham and Handley
D Squadron: Gillingham, with drill stations at Shaftesbury, Stalbridge and Sturminster Newton

The regiment started numbering from 1 in April 1908, those men transferring from the Dorsetshire Imperial Yeomanry (Queen’s Own) being issued with new numbers. The majority of 1908 enlistments were men who had formerly served in the Imperial Yeomanry.

122 joined on 1st April 1908
173 joined on 2nd February 1909
426 joined on 10th February 1910
483 joined on 31st January 1911
552 joined on 24th January 1912
658 joined on 22nd March 1913
724 joined on 5th February1914
800 joined on 7th August 1914
1011 joined on 10th September 1914


In September 1914 the 2/1st Dorset Yeomanry was formed, later converting into a cyclist unit in 1916. A 3/1st unit was formed in 1915 which remained in the UK until disbanded in 1917. All three units drew their regimental numbers from the same series.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

Fife & Forfar Yeomanry 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Fife & Forfar Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

The regiment
has its origins in the Forfar Troop which was raised in 1793.  By 1914, and several  name changes later, it was
headquartered at Kirkcaldy and formed part of the Highland Mounted Brigade. It was distributed as follows:

A Squadron: Cupar
B Squadron: Dunfermline
C Squadron: Dundee
D Squadron: Forfar 

When, on 1st April 1908, it became the Fife & Forfar Yeomanry, it continued with the numbering series which it had used when it was the Fife & Forfar Imperial Yeomanry. Men who transferred from the Imperial Yeomanry to the Yeomanry retained their Imperial Yeomanry numbers and the majority of 1908 enlistments were men who had formerly served in the Imperial Yeomanry.
553 joined on 18th April 1908
1228 joined on 9th February 1909
1343 joined on 21st January 1910
1561 joined on 17th April 1911
1696 joined on 30th November 1912
1725 joined on 31st January 1913
1847 joined on 28th February1914
1873 joined on 6th August 1914
2065 joined on 16th September 1914
2237 joined on 20th October 1914
2397 joined on 30th November 1914

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.

10 June 2014

Derbyshire Yeomanry 1908-1914


This post will look at numbering in the Derbyshire Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

By 1914 The Derbyshire Yeomanry, headquartered at 91 Siddall's Road, Derby and forming part of the Notts and Derby Mounted Brigade, was distributed as follows:

A Squadron: Chesterfield, with drill stations at Ripley, Belper, Beauchief and Eckington.
B Squadron: Bakewell, with drill stations at Buxton, Tideswell, Matlock, Youlgrave and Hartington
C Squadron: Derby with drill stations at Osmaston Manor, Duffield and Wirksworth.
D Squadron: Derby, with drill stations at Ilkeston, Church Gresley and Repton.

The regiment did not start numbering from 1 in April 1908 but instead continued with the numbering sequence that had been in use when it was the Derbyshire Imperial Yeomanry. Men who had previously served with the Derbyshire IY, re-enlisted with the new Derbyshire Yeomanry using their old regimental numbers.

830 joined on 11th April 1908
1340 joined on 25th November 1909
1424 joined on 21st October 1910
1445 joined on 18th January 1911
1549 joined on 15th November 1912
1629 joined on 10th October 1913
1759 joined on 18th March 1914
1794 joined on 11th August 1914
1869 joined on 11th September 1914
2010 joined on 14th October 1914

A 2/1st regiment had been formed in September 1914 and a 3/1st unit would be formed in 1915. All three battalions drew their regimental numbers from the same series.

Image borrowed form the Derbyshire Yeomanry website.

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http://www.naval-military-press.com/product.php?productid=20671&partner=PaulNixon
 
From the Naval & Military Press:
 
When the Territorial Force was created in 1908, the Derbyshire Yeomanry, together with the South Notts Hussars and Sherwood Rangers formed the Notts and Derby Mounted Brigade in the 1st Mounted Division. In September 1914 another mounted division was formed, the 2nd, to which the Notts and Derby Brigade was transferred, and in November the division was deployed along the Norfolk coast, the regiment being stationed in Cromer. In April 1915 the division sailed for Egypt where the brigade was re-designated 3rd Mounted Brigade. In August the division was sent, dismounted, to Gallipoli, landing at Suvla and two or three days later (21st August) the regiment was involved in the advance across the open from Lala Baba to Chocolate Hill in which action losses amounted to 78 with 20 dead. In October the division was withdrawn and sent back to Egypt where it was broken up. The 3rd Mounted Brigade was ordered to Salonika where it arrived in February 1916. The regiment remained in Macedonia for the rest of the war.
 
This history, primarily intended for members of the regiment, gives a good account of the regiment's war service at Gallipoli and in Macedonia. Lie of the land, climate, conditions, health and medical, operations, opinions of Turks, Bulgars and Russians are all discussed and described, and the narrative covers activities in and out of the line. The final chapter contains the list of officers who served overseas with the regiment (67, among them Capt Sir Oswald Mosley), Roll of Honour (79 dead of whom three were officers), list of Mentions in Despatches and Honours and Awards. There is no index

 
 


Denbighshire Yeomanry 1908-1914

This post will look at numbering in the Denbighshire Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

In 1914 The Denbighshire Yeomanry was headquartered at No. 1 Erdigg Road, Wrexham with A Squadron also based in Wrexham and with drill stations at Llangollen, Mold and Rusbon. B Squadron was based in Denbigh with drill stations at Prestatyn, Rhyl and Ruthin. C Squadron was based in Bangor with drill stations at Carnarvon, Llandudno and Beaumaris. D Squadron was based at Birkenhead. The regiment was part of the Welsh Border Mounted Brigade.

Numbering started from 1 in April 1908 and continued at a snail's pace over the next six years. The majority of 1908 enlistments were men who had formerly served with the Imperial Yeomanry.

149 joined on 15th April 1908
293 joined on 29th November 1909
348 joined on 27th September 1910
407 joined on 29th November 1911
453 joined on 17th December 1912
475 joined on 11th February 1913
509 joined on 16th January 1914
541 joined on 4th August 1914
608 joined on 1st September 1914
888 joined on 12th October 1914
938 joined on 2nd November 1914
1086 joined on 14th December 1914

The 2/1st Denbighshire Yeomanry was formed in September 1914 and was converted into a cyclist unit in July 1916. A 3/1st unit was also formed in 1915 and it remained in the United Kingdom until it was disbanded in 1917.

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Royal 1st Devonshire Yeomanry 1908-1914



This post will look at numbering in the Royal 1st Devonshire Yeomanry between 1908 and 1914.

By 1914 The Royal 1st Devonshire Yeomanry, headquartered at 9 Dix's Field, Exeter, and forming part of the 2nd South Western Mounted Brigade, was distributed as follows:

A Squadron: Thorverton, with drill stations at Crediton, Tiverton, Rackenford, Cullompton and Bampton.
B Squadron: Ottery St Mary, with drill stations at Exmouth, Exeter, Axminster, Sidmouth and Dawlish.
C Squadron: Totnes, with drill stations at Moreton Hampstead, Bovey Tracey, Newton Abbot, Dartmouth, Kingsbridge and Plymouth.
D Squadron: Bodmin, with drill stations at Launceston, Camelford, Liskeard, Truro, Helston and Penzance.

The regiment did not start numbering from 1 in April 1908 but instead continued with the numbering sequence that had been in use when it had been the Royal 1st Devon Imperial Yeomanry.

891 joined on the 25th April 1908
1767 joined on 22nd January 1909
1907 joined on 30th April 1910
1939 joined on 24th January 1911
2068 joined on 7th March 1912
2137 joined on 14th January 1913
2266 joined on 5th March 1914
2309 joined on 7th August 1914
2506 joined on 7th September 1914
2546 joined on 6th October 1914
2840 joined on 20th November 1914

A 2/1st regiment had been formed in September 1914 and a 3/1st unit would be formed in 1915. All three formations shared the same regimental numbering sequence.

Image from the Royal Devon Yeomanry Museum collection borrowed from the Army Museums Ogilby Trust.

I also offer a comprehensive, fast and cost-effective military history research service. Follow the link for more information.